Visitors

Current and Past Visitors

I am currently working as Associate Professor at National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune. My main interests are studying active galaxies at low radio frequencies in general. I am also interested in imaging of deep fields at low radio frequencies to search for high redshift radio galaxies. 

Prof. Ishwara-Chandra

I am currently working as Associate Professor at National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune. My main interests are studying active galaxies at low radio frequencies in general. I am also interested in imaging of deep fields at low radio frequencies to search for high redshift radio galaxies. 

National Centre for Radio Astrophysics

Mark SubbaRao was born in Charlotte North Carolina in 1968. He received his bachelor's degree in engineering physics from Lehigh University and his Ph.D. The John Hopkins University in astrophysics. His Ph.D. thesis concerned the characterization and evolution of the luminosity function of galaxies.
He next worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Chicago on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a project to make the largest 3D map of the universe. He was a developer of the survey's spectroscopic pipeline which measured classified and measured their distances to one million deep sky objects. Asteroid 170009 Subbarao is named after him in recognition of his work on the survey.
Mark is an author on more than 100 scientific publications. In 2003 he joined the staff of the Adler Planetarium, currently directing their Space Visualization Laboratory. He has led the development of major exhibition galleries such as The Universe: A Walk Through Time and Space. He has also produced, written and directed a number of HD, stereoscopic videos as well as fulldome planetarium shows. These include the feature planetarium shows Welcome to the Universe and Cosmic Wonder. His visualizations have been widely shown in print and television. He was part of a team that created a first prize winning visualization in the 2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. He was also on a team that was awarded the best visualization at XCEDE 2013. Dr. SubbaRao chairs the International Planetarium Society's Task Force on Science and Data Visualization, and is a member of the Data Visualization Advisory Committee of the Research Computing Center at the University of Chicago. He is also the Adler Planetarium's institutional representative on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

Dr Mark Subbarao

Mark SubbaRao was born in Charlotte North Carolina in 1968. He received his bachelor's degree in engineering physics from Lehigh University and his Ph.D. The John Hopkins University in astrophysics. His Ph.D. thesis concerned the characterization and evolution of the luminosity function of galaxies.
He next worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Chicago on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a project to make the largest 3D map of the universe. He was a developer of the survey's spectroscopic pipeline which measured classified and measured their distances to one million deep sky objects. Asteroid 170009 Subbarao is named after him in recognition of his work on the survey.
Mark is an author on more than 100 scientific publications. In 2003 he joined the staff of the Adler Planetarium, currently directing their Space Visualization Laboratory. He has led the development of major exhibition galleries such as The Universe: A Walk Through Time and Space. He has also produced, written and directed a number of HD, stereoscopic videos as well as fulldome planetarium shows. These include the feature planetarium shows Welcome to the Universe and Cosmic Wonder. His visualizations have been widely shown in print and television. He was part of a team that created a first prize winning visualization in the 2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge. He was also on a team that was awarded the best visualization at XCEDE 2013. Dr. SubbaRao chairs the International Planetarium Society's Task Force on Science and Data Visualization, and is a member of the Data Visualization Advisory Committee of the Research Computing Center at the University of Chicago. He is also the Adler Planetarium's institutional representative on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

Adler Planetarium

Jeroen is involved in the Cosmic Magnetism key science development for the SKA and is a core member of the teams for several large polarization surveys, including POSSUM on ASKAP. MIGHTEE on MeerKAT, GALFACTS with Arecibo and several projects with the JVLA.  He is an expert in Faraday synthesis and the use of polarization radiation as an astrophysical probe.

Dr. Jeroen Stil

Jeroen is involved in the Cosmic Magnetism key science development for the SKA and is a core member of the teams for several large polarization surveys, including POSSUM on ASKAP. MIGHTEE on MeerKAT, GALFACTS with Arecibo and several projects with the JVLA.  He is an expert in Faraday synthesis and the use of polarization radiation as an astrophysical probe.

University of Calgary
Ray Norris

Prof. Norris is a world-leading radio astronomer and the principal investigator of the EMU project, which is the large SKA pathfinding continuum survey with the Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP).

He also has a strong interest in aboriginal astronomy and has undertaken research in both Australian aboriginal astronomy and ancient sites in Europe.

This compliments some of the work into indigenous and cultural astronomy in Africa as was displayed at the recent ‘Shared Skies’ exhibition at the South African National Gallery (Iziko Museums) in Cape Town.

Prof. Ray Norris

Prof. Norris is a world-leading radio astronomer and the principal investigator of the EMU project, which is the large SKA pathfinding continuum survey with the Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP).

He also has a strong interest in aboriginal astronomy and has undertaken research in both Australian aboriginal astronomy and ancient sites in Europe.

This compliments some of the work into indigenous and cultural astronomy in Africa as was displayed at the recent ‘Shared Skies’ exhibition at the South African National Gallery (Iziko Museums) in Cape Town.

Western Sydney University

VISITORS INSTRUCTIONS

If you would like to meet with researchers at our head office, please contact us on (+27) 21 650 5273 so we may make the necessary preparations.

To further assist your journey, here are directions from Cape Town International Airport to the IDIA Head Office:

Proceed on the N2 (Settler's Way). Take exit 6 for the M3 (Rhodes Drive) toward Muizenberg. Take exit 7 for the M89 (Woolsack Drive) toward UCT and continue as the road curves. Proceed straight onto Rugby Road. Slight right to stay on Rugby Road. Turn right onto Residence Road. The R W James Building will be on the left.

While in Cape Town, you may want to visit a few points of interest such as the V&A Waterfront, Robben Island, Table Mountain, Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens and the Cape of Good Hope.

Additionally, if you would like to visit our partner universities, please see information below.

 

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